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in your home state. that is the way it used to work and we can make it work that way again. there are a number of things we have to do immediately. we may disagree on how to dress them but not the need for them to be addressed. each of you are making different decisions you are grappling with it. i do not think there is much much difference. i'm not mad a governor from the time of implementing the recovery act and on now who does not think we have to do something about our infrastructure. there is very little disagreement on the need too build an education that has such immense possibilities for our people. most of these issues were united by more than what divides us. these all intersect at a place where both the state and federal governments engage. we are going to have to work together. they overlap, in many cases. we will have our differences. we should all agree that the united states has to have the highest percentage of college graduates of any nation in the world. everyone disagrees. some of you governors have led the way an early education and the consequences for
can tweet us. we have 35, is already on facebook. and you can always e-mail us at urnal@cspan.org legislators step up for paid sick leave. some pretty 9% of private-sector workers are not entitled to paid time off when they fall ill according to the bureau of labor statistics. low-wage and part-time workers, particularly those who work at small firms or who work in restaurants, are among the least likely to get paid sixth time. to change that, democratic lawmakers and their allies in maryland, washington, and massachusetts, and cities including new york, philadelphia, and portland, or try to advance measures that would make a sixth time a legal requirement for most firms. in congress, senator tom harkin plans to reintroduce a federal paid sick leave bill this spring. some employers contend the measure has harmed workers with company wage and increase -- which by prompting cuts in wages or increases. we are asking you about the federal government and if there should be a federal mandate when it comes to paid sick days. here is how you can reach out to us, on our phone lin
are paying them. i can't believe we can't use the marines in these situations. someone has got to do a cost benefit analysis. can you imagine the amount of money we have spent fooling around with these contractors that weren't getting the job done? can you imagine the time we have spent on this and the money that has been spent? i would like for you, general, to talk about the cost benefit of putting marines in our embassies and why in the world this is hard for us to get our arms around and where is the analysis that shows us we are saving any money. >> just to react briefly to what would be necessarily a much longer conversation. the marines are not -- that's not their role or what they do for the nation. could it be at some point potentially? i would hate to think we would make that decision based on costs but it would require a longer conversation. >> i guess my point is god forbid we have something happen in kabul. this would look like child's play if you look at the history of what's gone on in terms of the guard force at kabul. and you know, i want to be to rt would be necessarily a
of the u.s. capitol the sunday. the nation's governors continue their winter meeting on sunday. congress returns tomorrow with the senate. chuck hagel is expected to be the next defense secretary. a boat could happen early as tuesday. and those automatic budget cuts -- budget cuts begin to kick in. on the sunday, often during, 24, we will begin with the topic of health care. specifically, medicaid. is it a good idea? we want to get your thoughts on all of this. 202 is the area code. 585-3881 for the republicans. 202-585-3880 is our democratic line. you can also join us at facebook or send us an e-mail. a couple of issues dealing with health care and the elderly. a cover story, "increased -- a crisis in plain sight." and this cover story from time magazine called, "why medical billsa re killing us." and from "the new york times," -- there is the story of one of a number of republican governors -- he said ohio would reverse this decision if the government failed to cover all the cost of the expansion. here are some details for ohio -- last year the supreme court ruling that they have the a
. following the consequences of the drought last year, the president directed us to create a drought task force, made up of all federal agencies, to try to mitigate the impacts and effects of drought. that led us to begin thinking at usda about steps we can take to help producers during a difficult time. we took a series of steps to try to mitigate the consequences. we opened up crp land, and changed premium payments, things of that nation -- that nature. it also got us thinking -- were there other steps, other things we should be doing, to provide help and assistance? it occurred to us perhaps we should be focused more acutely on the need to encourage multi- cropping through the united states, in order for us to do a better job of conservation, to create biomass that could be a revenue source, and to potentially allow us to conserve precious water resources, which would in turn allow us to get through these drought circumstances in a more favorable circumstance. we have begun a process of looking at ways in which we could provide assistance. you will be fortunate to hear from a fellow by
used was one of the best we had ever encountered. >> so mr. al-awlaki is by not an american citizen by where anyone in america would be proud? >> he was part of al qaeda, and it was his determination to kill americans on behalf of al qaeda. >> thank you. is it true that in the last four years the fbi has arrested 100 people, either planning, conspiring, or trying to commit a terrorist attack on this nation? >> yes, they have arrested a lot of people. >> that is because of good, sound intelligence. i think what people forget is that they will kill us if they can and it is extraordinarily difficult if you cannot get into where they were hiding. would it have been possible to have arrested mr. al-awlaki where he was in the yemen? >> we work very closely with yemenis to see if we can arrest individuals. if we can, we want to do that because it is valuable for us. any actions taken in concert with the yemeni government are done in terms of any types of strikes we might engage there with them, are done only because we do not have the ability to bring those individuals into custody. >> tha
will be very difficult. host: why? guest: [inaudible] host: when they use the word lifeline, what does that say to you? >> guest: that is the difficulty. how they get fuel and structure, to the local police. a lot of these local units are in small villages and difficult to get to. they may be in trouble and they -- and maybe because they're out this is the firstrefus indication of problems. caller: i am calling for mississippi. [indiscernible] i do not want them over there. i cannot understand why -- what they need to do there. just think what that were due to our borders for education of our children. it does not seem fair and all that we have to go over there and you soldiers for this purpose. guest: that is the decision that the policymakers will have to make. why we're there or how long we stay, are decisions above my pay grade. i do not avoided but my job is to look that now that we're there, are we spending the money well? the policy decision is for congress and the senior executive branch. host: sounds like our tax dollars will be going to afghans for decades. guest: the tweet raises a g
that is the biggest window. that is not over populated by u.s. capacity and capability. it is not religious. it is a it is not religious. we can extend it as needed. it should make us be more urgent. we find that when we bring urgency to almost any discussion inside of the u.s. government is a constructive thing to do. >> there are a number of areas in the u.s. government that look at failed and failing state. the undersecretary for political affairs has that responsibility. dns see used to chair and -- the nsc used to chair a committee. how does cso play into this? >> we try to work with everyone that you mentioned. we want to be aggregators of talent and good work that has gone on. for example, something as simple as analytics, we have a metadata analyst in our shop now, but we want him to be an aggregator of aggregators. i keep saying you have to be made silver on steroids -- nate silver on steroids. we cannot run enough staff to review and it turns out the intelligence community loves being called by the state department. they are flattered by it. they want their wo
of the subcommittee. i am looking forward to working with the ranking members as we both share a commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our board agents -- ensuring our border agents receive the support they need to protect homeland. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of home as security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshmen majority members. we have mr. richard hudson of north carolina. later joining us will be stephen from montana. they bring a welcome experience to their new roles in congress and the subcommittee. i look for to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of hds. -- of dhs. i think the subcommittee staffer diligently working together to put this hearing together. thank you for that. i now recognize myself for an opening statement. next month marks 10 years since the creation of the dhs with the homeless security act of 2001. the attacks on september 11 forced to rethink our approach to defining the homeland. as the commission report document
to be a challenge for us. at the end of the day for us in utah and other states that are struggling, how has our approach to health care reform and operate in an a.c.a. world, how do we fit in with the law of the land? our exchange, we have named it avenue h and it's not for avenue herbert, but the difference between the federal exchange -- we talk about the exchanges that have taken on a negative contation. an ability to facilitate people's choices is a good idea. our exchange are those different from those envisioned by the a.c.a. we focus on small business, working through them to provide access to their employees on an individual business, but through the business community and get people enrolled in private insurance. our exchange, interestingly enough, only has five employees. the total costs for what we do on an annual basis is $600,000 a year. we aren't spending a lot of money on this process. so we have the ability to expand. but we have an administrative process, which means we let the market make the decisions. we facilitate opportunities and that's all that we do. by contrast, the a.
washington post" know. we had good relationships not only with chen and his allies. they would call us when there were developments, like the case of chen's nephew, who was jailed. we have good contacts. >> you are going to harvard? >> i am. >> what for? you have left china for good? >> i have. from one great institution to another. i will be leading a study trip -- a study group on china. i will be looking at different sections of the study group, the rise of the internet. chinese twitter, the impact that has. we will look about the leadership of china to see what that will mean about the possibilities of reform. one session will last at media coverage, specifically american media coverage, of china. and how that shapes perceptions. the foreign media and how we cover things shape how we view china. we write about him and rights, china's dramatic growth rates, china as a competitor, their education system producing more graduates. i want to look more specifically about that. i want to vote -- to devote another section to chinese political campaigns. being in china, watching the campaigns he
other is a big thing for us and we think of value to the consumer. >> david steel from this year's consumer electronics show tonight at 8:00 eastern on "communicators" on cspan 2. >> ben cardin spoke with federal workers at the national institute of health and maryland. he talked about sequestration budget cuts and other issues. sequestration calls for across- the-board cuts, totaling 1.2 trillion dollars over the next 10 years with 1.6 trillion coming out of the budget. this is just under an hour. >> good morning. >> that was a nice response. >> it's wonderful to see you here this morning at the national institute of health where we have the great fortune to have was united states senator ben cardin. welcome to all of you and those who are watching over the web. i want to say a few words about the senator and he is going to address you and we will have time for questions and answers. and we have ways to receive those for people who are here and over the internet. and we will make sure to respond to all directions from which those questions may come. >> for those of you with who
their approach to the syrian conflict does something they could do to reassure the u.s. and the international community, it seems to be another clear implication of what you are saying is that the u.s. takes further steps to support the syrian opposition it would be read as strengthening their view that we are out to get them. >> we are out to get assaad. are we ipso facto out to get adirondacks -- to get iran? are we going to protect the allies, which is something i think we need to do despite the fact that they have a bad record? no one in syria has a sterling record, but it think we need to give them the opportunity to say there is a news syria forming. do they want to be engaged? what is the relationship there? i'm not very optimistic that we could get the iranians on board, but maybe you could find a way to make them increasingly less relevant. do they equate that with a regime change? maybe. we have to be aware of it. i think that's a stretch. i think the iranians could see, what i say is increasing value in the opportunity to talk if they begin to understand that the region is not movi
at 9:30 eastern, the us- india relations at the carnegie endowment for international peace. and they look at sequestration, and automatic spending cuts set to go into effect march 1 that will affect federal workers. that is a 2 --- that is at 2:30 p.m. eastern. >> from the start, we told the board that the approach we were going to take, pretty straightforward. remember, we were set -- sent there to fix gm. that was the mission. go make this thing a viable company again. so we were all focused, and brought the message we are going to design, build, and sell the world's best vehicles. we are going to move quickly, we need your support, your input, and so we changed a few things about the board meeting. we shortened them considerably. we stayed away from the details or did not get in the weeds on how you build a car, but the bigger questions of financing, more out, positioning, marketing, that sort of thing. the board was very supportive of that, and we kept them informed. you know, we just took off. >> leading general motors through bankruptcy and the government bailout, for
. and that is why it is so important for us to do the report that we did. i will give you a perfect example. you have loan officers at banks being paid bonuses and pay based on how many loans they created. not whether those were good loans. not taking into account whether the loans would later default and caused sick of it and losses. there were a number of different causes of the financial crisis. we tried to bring a lot of transparency to it, to report on that. we are also doing a lot of work in this area to say what has not been dealt with. you are exactly right, fannie and freddie is not dealt with under dodd-frank. but let's talk about dodd-frank for a moment. there have been reforms to our financial system, but there needs to be significantly more. one thing about dodd-frank is it sets up a framework. but ultimately not all of the rules are implemented. there are very important standards that need to be set by the regulators and treasury. because what we are worried about is trying to protect americans in the event of another financial crisis. we do not want to be in a situation where one
are a citizen of the united states, you have become the enemy. i do not see anything wrong with using drone strikes to take them out. i just do not they have done a good job, i believe. host: what do you think? you should be in charge of the program and targeting american citizens? -- who should be in charge? caller: i do not believe it should be the department of defense. understanding there are several 1r ectives, one being 5240- there is the required targeting of citizens, targeted hits for certifications of these drawings. some are purchased by organizations and various agencies. they are hitting civilians whether it is just electromagnetic or i pray that they are not killing innocent citizens. this is a question here. 30,000 additional drones to be released, tested, and evaluated over the united states? i think america needs to wake up. 30,000 additional draws while we have homelessness, veterans returning, you can put that kind of money over the united states of america. there are too many directives out there and contractors who are now using these devices targeting citizens as we si
the memories of their fallen brothers, and to help us to remember why this country remains strong and free. how so few americans prevailed against so many, as to prepare for the citation, i will leave you with the words of clinton himself. because they say something about the army and something about america. they say something about our spirit, which will never be broken. "we were not going to be beaten that day. we will not back down in the face of diversity like that -- adversity like that. we're just going to win, plain and simple." god bless you, clinton romesha, and all of your team. god bless all who serve, and god bless the united states of america. with that, i would like the citation to be ready. >> the president of the united states of america, authorized by act of congress, march 3, 1963, has awarded in the name of congress the medal of honor to staff sergeant clinton romesha, u.s. army, force -- for conspicuous gallantry and intricately above and beyond the call of duty. clinton romesha this in which and self at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving i
you think congress should consider a proposal and vote? be prepared to tell us why or why not. here are the numbers. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. you can always send us e-mail. "the chicago tribune" picked up the story, talking about a wide range of issues. gun violence is the main topic of the speech. the reporter says -- part of the speeches today look to congress and what they should do. here is what he had to say. gu[video clip] >> ivory -- i recognize not everybody has to agree with our issues. different from upstate and downstate illinois. these proposals deserve a vote in congress. they deserve a vote. [applause] and i want to thank those members of congress who are working together in a serious way to try to address this issue. host: playing off of that repeated phrase, that is the question we propose to you, whether you think they deserve a vote. whether you do or don't, you could call on the lines that represent you. we have put this on twitter as well. facebook 2. we had about 20 responses when we first started the program. here are a couple o
minister here. this is an exciting time for us. we know of his leadership through the years and we are really delighted to have him here. we are excited that he can be with us today. i would especially like to say words of thanks for our colleagues. we are delighted to have you here, a senior advisor to the prime minister is here. the deputy chief and cabinet secretary. the ambassador is here, one of my bosses. i have to recognize him. a great service for america and japan, we are delighted to have you here. and the governor from alaska, he is our closest state to japan and has the keenest interest in japan. it is wonderful to have you here, governor. there is a new word in washington, the new economics that prime minister abe is bringing to japan. we have to get ourselves started again and i think that is exactly what he is doing in japan. i would like to take a second, talk about the foreign-policy agenda. japan's foreign policy going forward to protect freedom of thought, expression, and speech in the asia-pacific. can you think of anything more important than that? this will he
to say a word about the councils africa center for the benefit of the audience, those who are new to us were joining us for the first time via television or the internet. the africa center was established in september, 2009, with a mission to help transform u.s. and other healthy approaches to africa by emphasizing the building of strong geopolitical partnerships with african states and strengthening economic growth and prosperity on the continent. the center seeks to engage and inform with policymakers in the general public of the strategic importance of effort that. both globally and for american and european interest in particular. a subject which obviously -- a commitment you share by joining us today. of strategic importance. we do this for -- a robust media presence. we worked promote constructive us leadership and engagement in international affairs is done the central role of the atlantic community in meeting international challenges. the africa center supports and collaborates with product -- public and private sectors, giving practical solutions to the challenges in africa. on
also have to use the other policy tools in the european social fund. we need to invest to create jobs in europe. and reallocate some social funds to young people. growth and jobs are the guarantee for young people in europe. we need to work together to underscore the legitimacy of the european national parliament. we are deciding together on these issues. we need to cooperate with the national parliament and show what this group can do for the democracy. >> thank you, mr. president. president of the republic, france is a normal country in europe, but not an ordinary one. and in this time of uncertainty, europe is looking to france for two things. it needs to be exemplary at home, meeting the commitments it has made, working in a harmonious way in the european collective, and we are grateful that you up been trying to do that. there are some strange dissonances and europe is surprised to hear these. france is reducing its retirement age as europe gets older. everyone is trying to stop money being misused and promote growth to create new jobs and france is now punishing those people who
you all for joining us here today and thank you all who joined us. [applause] >> in a few moments, secretary of state john kerry gives an address at the university of virginia. in an hour, a defense -- department of defense briefing on sequestration. after that, it review of the 2012 presidential campaign with strategists from president obama and mitt romney. secretary of state john kerry is calling on congress not to make senseless reductions in foreign aid to automatic spending cuts scheduled to begin march 1. the secretary spoke at the university of virginia in charlottesville. he was introduced by virginia senator tim kaine. this is an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. thank you so much. hello, uva. it is great to be back on the grounds. i want to say to president sullivan what a treat it is to be here with you. thank you for hosting this great occasion. to my friend robert hurt, served with him in state government and now we travel to washington together. i look forward to good work together, especially if on this occasion to introduce secretary kerry and to introduce
's different? we have seen an enormous increase in the u.s. trade deficit, especially with countries like china. today, they happened to release a report that looked at the effect of currency manipulation, perhaps the single most important factor and explain the growth of our trade deficit. eliminating the trade deficit or eliminating currency manipulation could reduce the trade as a by roughly $190-$490 billion. doing this would increase manufacturing employment by up to 1 million jobs. that's a big downpayments in the whole we have created in manufacturing and employment. one thing we need to do is create demand. that is what we did do but we did not do that in the last decade. we need to shift the demand to domestic produced goods resulting in the hiring of domestic workers. manufacturing jobs are amongst the best for workers especially for those without a college degree. high wages, good benefits. >> bruce, you worked in washington, d.c., and brookings is right off dupont. >> i am mostly on a plane. >> industrial policy is a dirty word. if you go to any other domestic place, it will land yo
>> let's talk about recent comments in canada, the u.s. ambassador to canada and find that more action by canada on climate change might make it easier for the president to approve keystone. how did you interpret those comments? >> i think it was another opportunity to talk about what we are doing. i believe for the president and for canada, it is both. you can actually improve energy security and in our neighborhood of north america and with vehicle emissions standards, coal plants standards, you will eventually see that in the united states. nobody is replacing a coal plant with coal again. they are replacing it with natural gas. it reduces emissions by 50%. i did not see that as a quid pro quo. when the secretary of state and our minister of foreign affairs met and had a press conference, they talked about both climate change and energy security. we talked about vehicle emissions standards. th minister talked about the action we've taken had the the united states on coal plants in canada. i closed down some coal plants. i thought it was good for our jurisdiction but i think e
will dramatically -- he will not be creating a food that is in front of you anymore. these are simple ways for us to nudge the biology of blubber and the right direction. sedentary lifestyle? if you sit -- your mortality rates increase is 11%. it is important because it avoids frailty. if i got rid of all the can see in america, we would live in average of 2.8 years longer. that is it. a little more than two years longer. what kills people is not the cancer, it is there too frail to whether the treatment or recover after word spread same for heart disease. we go around the world where people live a long time. what do you do about it? you have to push yourself. look in the wild. when you do not push yourself, you end up with a bony problems. osteoporosis. you have medications for it, but they are expensive. they do not work as well as resistance training. getting people to recognize it means reminding them what they used to do. here is a cheetah chasing its prey. watch what happens. ask yourself -- when was the last time you went at full speed? when was the last time you gave it everything you had
will use super bowl sunday to talk about government regulations when it comes to the issue of steroids or head injuries. the phone lines are open. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines courtesy of the museum. from "the san francisco chronicle" -- from "the baltimore sun" -- let's turn to the politics and policy behind the nfl. this is a story a few days ago from "the washington post." outlining a plan and a letter to the executive director of the players union. they agreed as part of a 2011 collective bargaining agreement that the players should be tested for hgh, but the two sides of that agreed. two seasons have been played without it. last weekend in new orleans, roger goodell was asked a number of questions including one on the issue of head injuries. here is more from last week. [video clip] >> i welcome the president's comments. we want to make sure people understand what we are doing to make our game safer, not just in the nfl but throughout sports. the changes we are making a in the nfl are changing all of sports. it is a better recognition of head injuries. of treat
armed service committee. this should begin in a second. let us watch. we will cavill and to hear from defense secretary leon panetta and general martin dempsey about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi that resulted in the death of four americans. one week ago today, this committee heard from senator chuck hegel -- hagel to be the next defense secretary. the center of south carolina said he would put a hold on former senator hagel's nomination unless leon panetta agreed to testify. this is the first of two harris we will show you today. this and later this afternoon, the confirmation hearing for cia director nominee, john brennan, currently the counter-terrorism chief. >> good morning, everybody. we welcome secretary of defense leon panetta and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff general martin dempsey to testify about the department of defense's response to the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya on september 11 and all of last year. the findings of its review following that attack, including lessons learned. i want to remi
political parties and civic groups because at least in theory parties are more accountable and tend to use their money to help challenges and are less inclined to support extremist, which is no small matter in today's polarized environment. here we go. thank you. here are some trends i see and how citizen as united plays into them. it did not cause them but it greases the wheels, especially since 2000 to when congress passed the bi-partisan campaign reform act. there is a redistribution of money away from can't attend -- candidates and toward groups. candidates are chiefly responsible but more is spent by others and for a while was political parties but it is non-party groups and citizens united cracked up this dynamic. -- ratches up this dynamic. there are strong incentives for collective action by partisans. national politics today is about high-stakes elections. both parties have a chance to control government and have very different views about what should be done. because of this, parses want to organize and coordinate but campaign finance laws but restraint of that. the laws were de
government is tied to a large number of cyber attacks on the u.s.. if the administration released a report that it will consider fines and other trade actions against china or any other country guilty of cyber espionage. we will continue to follow that story and bring you any remarks that may come out from administration officials today. the supreme court is expected to hear arguments in late march in two prominent cases that could test the bounds of laws restricting gay marriage. authors of "recently released book some day marriage recently debated the issue at harvard university. it is and about how to by the federalist society at harvard. this is one hour. >> thank you. richard fallon is the junior professor of constitutional law at harvard law school. he also earned a ba degree from oxford university, where he was a rhodes scholar. he served as a law clerk to justices of the united states supreme court and has written extensively about constitutional and federal courts law. he is the author of several books. we are very grateful for him for participating. andrew koppelman is the john p
, and how to present the program, how to do what you're doing now. host: your in the u.s., based in afghanistan, what are you doing here in washington? guest: i am here to say that open media in afghanistan is a big achievement. not only for the public, but for everyone i want to say that this is a big achievement after 11 years we lost more than 39 journalists from 2001 up until now, more than hundreds of injuries, more than thousands of arrests and people who were insulted and faced with harassment. let's not lose this achievement. a side of focus on security forces, stress fractures in afghanistan, focusing on media for lots of afghan people. afghans are quite aware what is freedom of expression and how they can use it in their daily lives. let's focus on it and not lose it. host: while you're in u.s., are you having to justify the money you are receiving? guest: yes, i have to justify the money we are receiving and say that not only for nai media institute, or the organizations we are receiving the money from, from ucid, the sector, the deal is something to really need focus.
aware what is freedom of expression. how they can use it in their daily lives. let's focus on and not pollute it. >> what you are a share in washington, who are you talking to? are you having to justify the money you are receiving from the united states? >> yes, just to justify the money we are receiving, not only for the organization. defector, the field is something they really focus. >> in afghanistan we have different rules of receiving information it is a radio. all over the country. it is mostly popular in the city's that we have that. printed media is also more of a usable thing or a tool and the places people are in a couple. nowadays we are having social media where people are receiving the news. more than the 3% of the population of afghanistan through radio. >> you mentioned the literacy rates. here in afghanistan, literacy rate over all 28%. mail literacy -- average imasco years is a 11 average. female 7. given the and the numbers, how difficult is your job of getting a promotion to afghanis. >> when you see 20% of the population is more than 72% are eligible, i
on the climate change front, this might help us. canadian politicians are running around now that there is greenhouse gas admission in the air. they are going to great length to point that out. who is a real climate laggard if the u.s. is not serious on getting on this. >> that is the point. language is important. it can be a real problem. that relativity will be pointed to. given the breath of things, the things that we need to do together and the issues we need to tackle together has a common view. that ranges from foreign affairs to our common economic future. it would be unhelpful if this was more than just a bump in the road that became something that pushed us off the road. >> i think danielle wanted to jump in. before that, i get a sense of your questions in the audience. i see some hands. ok. if you change your mind and more hands went to ask, i will get to that depending on how much time is reserved. >> the decision around the keystone is not necessarily lateral. who will be point our finger at if the president makes a decision we do not like? canada has played a rol
to review and update nga policies. the staff advisory committee has recommended action in front of us all. this has been vetted with all of the staffs of the members of the state of the governors who are members of the committee. i think it has been well-known and well covered. i do not think there is a reason to discuss it unless someone has an objection. . i think emotion has been made. and seconded -- a motion estimate. and seconded. all in favor say aye? >> aye. >> adjourned, all in favor say aye? >> aye. [captions copyright nationalcable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed bynational captioning institute] >> we're opening the phone lines now. you can let us know what you think that what you heard from the governors during their meeting. the numbers to call her on your screen. you can also let us know what you think using twitter. if you called us in the past 30 days, give others a chance to weigh in. the governors have talked about education, cybersecurity, and employment for people with disabilities. our first caller is jane, on the line from columbus. what did you think ab
"commitment to the values that define us as americans." others note his impeccable integrity and his dedication to the country is second to none. without unanimous consent, i would like to insert into the record matters the committee has received in regard to brennan's nomination. john brennan by all accounts will be a strong leader, guided firmly by the law and his strong ethical code. he has assured the committee in his response to pre-hearing questions that he will be independent from political influence. he will seek only to provide the president, the congress, and other leaders with his best analysis and advice. his responses to the committee's questions are available on the committee's website. intelligence.senate.gov. of course the committee must conduct its due diligence on such an important nominee, some members are going to have questions in a range of topics, including his plans for directing the agency, major national security challenges we face, positions and actions he has taken in his current and past jobs. also of interest will be mr. brennan's the view on the use of
will be talking about it on tuesday. the numbers -- you can also send us an e-mail, join us at corridor.com -- twitter.com/cspanwj. great expectations, immigration is one of the issues on the president's agenda. he may get much of what he wants in part because a bipartisan support on the issue of immigration. he will look for ways to declare victory on guns and climate change. the focus on the economy, that is one headline we are getting. the front page of the washington post -- the reporting of scott wilson, the chief white house reporter for the washington post. chris van hollen is our guest on c-span's newsmakers program. he is a leading democrat in the house of representatives. >> the president will be delivering his state of the union address this week. i think he will address those questions. we are so caught up in dealing with these short-term, self- imposed crises that is undermining our ability to come up with a long-term comprehensive planned. there are philosophical differences. our republican colleagues do not believe that there is any role for the government beyond providin
streets safer. here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet. we can share that on the air. you can also find us online on facebook. or e-mail us. nbc's a recent story from news. currently 21 states and washington use automated cameras at traffic intersections to catch violations such as running through red lights and stopping overnight lines. do you have red light camera in your community? if so, what do you think about them? sheryl is a democrat in baltimore. caller: good morning. thanks for letting me on. i live in baltimore and i am not sure if everyone has seen the news, but our red light camera parked car got a $40 speeding ticket and the car was not moving for . we want to make sure the equipment works and is accurate. -- -- and the car was not moving for 30 seconds. host: new york city is accused of rigging red lights in a class-action lawsuit. new york city is facing a class action lawsuit. the city accused of rigging lights to catch more drivers and right more tickets. -- write more tickets. isidor is a republican in washington, d.c. caller: in d.c
." this gives us much pride. under the leadership under billington and the chief of the manuscript division and his extraordinary staff. this has been a further website and much of the collection. there are gems here to be discovered by future generations. she has discovered the most important ways to use this description of specific items to assist those who will mind these riches in the years to come. the web site provides links to other protections. it became part of their history. everything will be connected. we are celebrating this evening collaborations' of all kinds that can only benefit the quest of knowledge. the library of congress is all about this quest. manuscripts, and musical scores, and frankly any medium from the past or present are yet to be invented in the future that will contain knowledge. these things are connected by the thousands of people or our doors literally or virtually every day. these form the foundation of the library of congress as a library but also its role as classrooms, lecture halls, a performance space, and vinny's for enlightenment and discovery of n
of this committee is one that is very proud to work together. i'm happy that you are here with us to help move that tradition forward at a greater and deeper rate. we deeply appreciate it. less than two miles from where we sit today at the entrance of u.s. treasury building that is a large, bronze statue. one would assume that the figure is alexander hamilton. america's first treasury secretary. look again. this 12 foot tall statue is of albert gallatin. the longest serving u.s. treasury. in a to one, thomas jefferson asked gallatin to serve. --in 1801, thomas jefferson asked gallatin to serve here in the place of treasury secretary is more than avarice and response will -- laborous and responsible than any other. what did he do? he established fiscal discipline that was necessary a country into a great world power. gallatin also help orchestrate the louisiana purchase, doubling the size of the united states. his work is commemorated in gallatin county, montana and a beautiful gallatin national forest in the rockies as well as the gallatin river in missouri. when gallatin accepted the decision
us to this point. today after two months i think we're going to do something very positive and do it in a very bipartisan way. i think that's excellent. i think america will be advantaged. every american, women, yes, but every woman will be advantaged. house democrats support the fully inclusive re-authorization of the violence against women act which passed the senate by a bipartisan vote of 78-22, as has been referenced. the majority of republican senators and all republican women senators voted in favor. that bill represents a compromise. i urge my colleagues to defeat the partisan amendment version so we can pass the senate bill. i voted for the rule, which allows us that opportunity. let us take it. the change -- changes house republicans made in their version significantly weaken its provisions. i want to say some republicans. i want to make that clear. not all. and protecting victims of domestic violence and empowering law enforcement to keep our people safe from these crimes. the house republican bill owe mitts critical protections for native americans, for lgbt americans
their creator had given all of us. to make decisions for good or bad and normally to have to live with the consequences -- consequences of those decisions. the global jihadist threat that secretary clinton pointed out does not have the belief that a democracy is a good idea. that a people electing representatives in a republican form of government is a good idea. they believed that we need some religious leader like the ayatollah khomeini or now in iran. they need a religious leader like that that tells us what we can do, that makes all his decisions under shari'a law. . all of those who met during the revolution, they believed in the power of prayer to god, and that's why they prayed during that time, but they wanted much to have the chance to worship as they chose. be they muslim, hindu. but especially judeo-christian beliefs where jews and christians had traditionally suffered so much persecution. they wanted the chance for people to worship as they please or not worship, but they knew to make that possible had he had to -- they had to pray to god. that's why we are observing o
and innovation, the highest honors bestowed by the u.s. government upon scientists, engineers, and inventors. you will have it for you later in our program schedule. at the white house, jay carney held his daily briefing, addressing a number of issues including a bombing at the u.s. embassy in turkey today. >> does the president considered the attack on our embassy in turkey to be a terrorist attack? >> that is an excellent question a suicide bombing on the perimeter of an embassy is by definition an act of terror, a terrorist attack. i think this is an incident that has just occurred and i don't want to get ahead of it, is being investigated. we strongly condemn what was a suicide attack against our embassy in ankara, which took place at the embassy's our security perimeter. details are still emerging about what exactly happened, who was responsible. it is clearly an act of terror. it caused -- cost hte life about least one individual, a turkish security guard. we are working with the turkish authorities to investigate the incident and bring the perpetrators to justice. our thoughts and prayers
to use that as a bargaining chip again. we saw how damaging bringing into question the credit worthyness of the government. the fight should not be should we pay the bill? >> there is an interesting question about in retrospect if republicans leveraging the debt limit to get a bill that cut spending by $1 to $2 trillion going forward whether that was worth it? they introduced liquidity risk. if you don't cut spending we're not going to vote for a debt limit increase. it worked. the president agreed to cut the spending by a significant amount. now, would you like that negotiation had resulted from not having made that threat? absolutely. but do you think it would have occurred? there's the difference. i would never be one to advocate that congress should not increase the debt limit. they should. when this came up in the summer of 2011 i wrote that and they put that in the pages of "the initial review." i was arguing against those who say let's look and creating a cash crunch. that is the wrong thing to do. congress has the ability to decide what they want to attach to the legislation. tha
. thank you for being with us on the "washington journal." the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., february 14, 2013. i hereby appoint the honorable chris collins to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 3, 2013, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each, but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair now recognizes the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. mullen, for five minutes. -- mr. mullin, for five minutes. mr. mullin: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house and to revise and extend. the speaker pro te
we are going to talk about state dinner and use that as an introduction for all of us and how they are put on, where the first lady comes into it, all of the various parts of the white house that get involved. it certainly is a big event and one that involves everybody. gary, can you start as off? it certainly is a big event and one that involves everybody. gary, can you start as off? as chief usher you handled the residence staff. >> i would be glad to. the first notice of a state dinner or state visit comes from the state department. it usually goes through the social secretary of the white house. soon after the socialists a cap -- after the social security -- social secretary had a conversation with the first lady, he would lay out who, when, where, and how it was going to be about. there was a lot of planning. usually these events are planned three, four, sometimes as much as a year into the future. sometimes a lot less time. the planning is intensive. i think one of the things people forget about state dinners is that they set a style for the white house from a social asp
. if i were to walk outside my home and go down the street and used it for any purpose, i would face one year in jail and $1,00a while ago was speaking out about getting guns across state lines. i know he probably doesn't deserve one, but how does he protect himself? you said a convicted felon should not have a gun, ever. host: we have a lot on the table, what is your response to the coat caller? guest: i was just saying that as a society, convicted felons lose their constitutional right to bear arms. i just don't see that changing. it is hard pressed to know what is in the heart of a convicted felon. it is about decisions and the consequences to it. to clarify what i said about children, lots of families take their kids to the range early. they also teach them to hunt early. not encouraging families, i just don't think you should keep guns a secret. i think by doing that, you keep a curiosity. keep your gun locked up, explained to them the basic safety. point in a safe direction. if they get curious or break into your safe, they will have all the safety things in place. ownerson the gun
and facebook posts. >> u.s. chamber of commerce ceo tom donahue on the economy and deficit reduction. he talked about immigration reform and the role of the private sector in promoting economic growth. the manhattan institute is the host of this hour-long program. >> president of the manhattan institute, it is my honor to introduce tom donohue, president of the u.s. chamber of commerce. [applause] it was in 1997 that tom donohue became president and ceo of the u.s. chamber, and he has built the chamber into an unparalleled lobbying and political powerhouse. has quadrupled the chambers' budget and added hundreds of thousands of new members during his tenure, policy experts and legal advocates have helped influence regulatory agencies and politics and in the court of public opinion and governments around the world. one of his credibility is is the neck to identify key issues will ahead of the curve. he has aggressively against american jobs and growth agenda, a plan that -- advance the american jobs and growth agenda, a plan that includes rebuilding infrastructure, combating an avalanche of new r
-mail us as well, journal@c-span.org. president obama was in minneapolis yesterday talking about gun control. here is what he had to say on background checks. [video clip] >> the vast majority of americans, including gun owners, support background checks for anyone trying to buy a gun. [applause] so, right now democrats and republicans in the senate are working on a bill that would ban anyone from selling a gun legally for him -- selling a gun to anyone legally prohibited from owning one. that is common sense. there is no reason we cannot get that done. that is not a liberal or conservative idea, it is a smart idea. we want to keep the guns out of the hands of folks who should not have them. senators from both parties have come together to propose a bill that would crack down on people who buy guns only to turn around and sell them to criminals. a bill that would keep more guns off the street and out of the hands of people with the intent of doing harm. [applause] by the way, in addition to reducing violence on the streets, it would make life easier and safer for the people standing
and defense. improving these things would do a lot more than just saving money. like 1996 that helped put us on a path to a balanced budget, smart welfare reform will help americans rise out of poverty. that's what i want to see. i want to see more people out of poverty and strengthen families, charity and community. we must talking honestly and compassion about these issues. i would like to take a moment to address some comments, senator murray, that you made recently, that republicans are committed to, quote, protecting the rich above all else. and are only interested in starving programs, i'm quoting, that help middle-class families and the most vulnerable americans. that hurts my feelings. that's not what i believe in. i believe we have to have an economy that's growing, creating prosperity and need to help poor people get jobs and move forward in their lives, not dependent, ever dependent on more and more government checks, handouts and programs. that would be the way to save this country, in my opinion. that's the way to help poor people and i resent the fact that those of us who have
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